Best Management Practices

SUCCESSFUL BMP's WITH MAQS

USE MAQS ANY TIME DURING YOUR BEEKEEPING SEASON WHEN MITE LEVELS EXCEED THRESHOLDS FOR YOUR AREA.

OUR BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES INCLUDE USING THE 7 DAY (2 STRIP, 1 APPLICATION) OR THE 21 DAY (1 STRIP, 2 APPLICATIONS) TREATMENT REGIMENS.

BEEKEEPING IS LOCAL – KNOW YOUR ZONE

increase

USE MAQS DURING COLONY POPULATION INCREASE

  • Feed your bees to stimulate brood production.
  • After the first pollen, monitor your colonies for Varroa mites.
  • Treat with MAQS before splitting colonies.

peak

USE MAQS AT COLONY PEAK

  • Protect the new brood with MAQS before the main honey flow.
  • Place an empty honey super on to give bees space to move up and expand.
  • Ensure entrances are fully open (full width of the hive, minimum 1.3cm (½inch) high).

decrease

USE MAQS BEFORE COLONY DECREASE

  • Treat at the end of the honey flow, while last honey super is still on.
  • Do not destroy queen cells/virgins that may be seen before or after treatment. Colonies may be going through supercedure; mother/daughter queens present post treatment is not uncommon.

Best Management Practices

Words from Commercial Beekeepers

…we have used formic since it became available and we have not experienced any significant losses in those 7 years. We did have some minor issues with Nosema, but now we treat twice a year with Fumigillin and have not had losses of field bees since we began regular treatments.

Although it (this treatment regimen) is more labor intensive and more expensive than some treatments beekeepers have been relying on, the results are dependable and worth the effort and expense.

Other treatments may seem inexpensive, but the cost to rebuild dead colonies must be factored in. Loss of honey production is also an issue that can be overlooked. Spending six dollars to treat a hive seems negligible when you can rent that hive for $150.00 for almond pollination. Now that the University of Minnesota has established the Bee Informed Partnership, we will have data to prove the effectiveness of MAQS. Get into a regular treatment program twice a year with MAQS and your bees will be as they should be, healthy and thriving.

Bonnie Woodworth

Beekeepers need to keep an eye on their queens and be ready to replace them if they think necessary. We had no trouble with acceptance of queens after treatment, so we suggest beekeepers work the timing of treatment into their management practices.

Bob Miller